Virtue of the Week: Kindness

KindnessBe Kind to Everyone

During my second year of nursing school our professor gave us a quiz. I breezed through the questions until I read the last one: “What is the first name of the woman who cleans the school?” Surely this was a joke. I had seen the cleaning woman several times, but how would I know her name? I handed in my paper, leaving the last question blank. Before the class ended, one student asked if the last question would count toward our grade. “Absolutely,” the professor said. “In your careers, you will meet many people. All are significant. They deserve your attention and care, even if all you do is smile and say hello.” I’ve never forgotten that lesson. I also learned her name was Dorothy.

~ Joann C. Jones


Mother Teresa on Kindness:

  • Every time you smile at someone, it is an action of love, a gift to that person, a beautiful thing.
  • I have found the paradox, that if you love until it hurts, there can be no more hurt, only more love.
  • If we want a kindness message to be heard, it has got to be sent out. To keep a lamp burning, we have to keep putting oil in it.
  • Do not think that love, in order to be genuine, has to be extraordinary. What we need is to continue to do small acts of kindness without getting tired.
  • Everybody today seems to be in such a terrible rush, anxious for greater developments and greater riches and so on, so that children have very little time for their parents, parents have very little time for each other, and in the home begins the disruption of peace of the world.
  • It is easy to love the people far away. It is not always easy to love those close to us. It is easier to give a cup of rice to relieve hunger than to relieve the loneliness and pain of someone unloved in our own home. Bring love into your home for this is where our love for each other must start.
  • If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one.
  • Even the rich are hungry for love, for being cared for, for being wanted, for having someone to call their own.
  • Let us always meet each other with a smile, for the smile is the beginning of love.
  • Loneliness and the feeling of being unwanted is the most terrible poverty.
  • Love begins at home, and it is not how much we do… but how much love we put in that action.
  • Spread love everywhere you go. Let no one ever come to you without leaving happier.
  • The biggest disease today is not leprosy or tuberculosis, but rather the feeling of being unwanted.
  • The hunger for love is much more difficult to remove than the hunger for bread.
  • The success of love is in the loving – it is not in the result of loving. Of course it is natural in love to want the best for the other person, but whether it turns out that way or not does not determine the value of what we have done.
  • In this life we cannot do great things. We can only do small things with great love.

  • Paid in Full

    One day, a poor boy who was selling goods from door to door to pay his way through school, found he had only one thin dime left, and he was hungry. He decided he would ask for a meal at the next house. However, he lost his nerve when a lovely young woman opened the door.

    Instead of a meal, he asked for a drink of water. She thought he looked hungry and so she brought him a large glass of milk.

    He drank it slowly, and then asked, “How much do I owe you?”

    “You don’t owe me anything,” she replied. “Mother has taught us never to accept pay for a kindness.”

    He said, “Then I thank you from my heart.”

    As Howard Kelly left that house, he not only felt stronger physically, but his faith in God and man was strengthened also. He had been ready to give up and quit.

    Years later, that young woman became critically ill. The local doctors were baffled. They finally sent her to the big city, where they called in specialists to study her rare disease.

    Dr. Howard Kelly was called in for the consultation. When he heard the name of the town she came from, he went down the hall of the hospital to her room. Dressed in his doctor’s gown, he went in to see her. He recognized her at once. He went back to the consultation room determined to do his best to save her life. From that day, he gave special attention to the case.

    After a long struggle, the battle was won. Dr. Kelly requested from the business office to pass the final billing to him for approval. He looked at it, then wrote something on the edge, and the bill was sent to her room. She feared to open it, for she was sure it would take the rest of her life to pay for it all. Finally she looked, and something caught her attention on the side of the bill. She read these words:

    “PAID IN FULL WITH ONE GLASS OF MILK…. ”
    (Signed)
    Dr. Howard Kelly